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Ripper Street‘Threads Of Silk And Gold’

Forbidden love is explored this week on Ripper Street after a young man is murdered in a hotel room in Whitechapel.

From this discovery our three main characters uncover a plot cooked up by a couple of telegram boys who blackmail wealthy homosexual clients on the side. They’ve got in deeper than they expected with a conspiracy that leads to one of London’s biggest banks.

After last week’s slightly disappointing episode, this one is a significant improvement. I feared they were once again going to put Susan in her ‘just a good looking plot point’ role but after her and Jackson’s relationship breakdown, and his failed attempt at rescuing her from Duggan, it looks like Susan will be having more storylines in her own right.
Duggan proved just how dangerous he really is when he beats Jackson up and nonchalantly slits his throat in a scene that’s genuinely chilling.

Back to the episodes main plot and David and his lover Vincent are driven to desperate means to start a new life together, whilst the usually no morals newspaperman, Fred Best (David Dawson), is revealed as a gay man so scared of exposure that he ends up betraying his own ethics. It’s good to see a softer side to a character that has usually been seen as a caricature of a no moral journalist.

The two main characters expose not only the gay underground of London but also the corruption that was at the heart of London’s banking industry. The inclusion of both storylines makes the historical piece seem relevant to modern times and this episode shows a great amount of historical accuracy.

Reid once again has a humbled moment after seeing the bravery of the two telegram boys and the lengths they have to go to just try and be together. He delivers a beautifully moving speech to Jane Cobden (his newest romantic interest) saying “I have had enough of the darkness, if you would help me know the sun”. Some might see this as a cheesy, over-emotional moment but it had me tearing up a treat. It’s been an interesting series for Reid – going from his black and white outlook, to appreciating the grey areas of life. I for one like the more morally ambiguous Reid.

This was an emotionally loaded episode of Ripper Street, which had a predictably sad ending that picked up the effectively darker narrative of earlier episodes.

★★★★

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