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fast and furious 62013

Genre: Action, Crime, Drama

Directed by: Justin Lin

Starring: Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Dwayne Johnson, Michelle Rodriquez

Once again Dominic Toretto and his team of ‘we’ll rob anything on wheels’ carjacker/street racer criminals are back, only this time they find themselves on the correct side of the law…just. Justin Lin, the man who’s directed the previous few instalments – the ones that have lifted the franchise to a much higher level – is still at the helm and back on the screen are regulars Vin Diesel, Paul Walker and Michelle Rodriguez, joined by previous addition Dwayne ‘my-muscles-are-too-large’ Johnson and new bad guy Luke Evans. Since The Fast and the Furious this crew have upgraded to a whole new level where street racing and selling knock off car parts is long behind them. Now they’re working for the good guys, attempting to retrieve a stolen computerised chip worth billions.

With the crew now scattered across the globe, spending their millions from the previous movie, not much is going on in terms of fast cars. They’re all settling down and putting this past life behind them. But when terrorists begin to steal from heavy armoured military, using the same methods as Toretto once did, Dwayne Johnson must recruit Toretto and his team to catch these terrorists led by Luke Evans. At first the gang are reluctant but when Toretto is shown pictures of the presumed dead Letty he convenes his team for a mission that could wipe their criminal slates clean.

Lets jump straight in with the performances because poor acting lessens most action films. Vin Diesel is Dominic Toretto and Paul Walker is Brian O’Connor. You can’t really criticise or praise either performance because they play characters that resemble the people we believe them to be. Other members of the team – Ludacris, Tyrese Gibson, Sung Kang, Gal Gadot – all continue to show that they fit into this world and Dwayne Johnson brings his usual badassness to a typical Dwayne Johnson role – if anything this was made for him. New addition Gina Carano also adds decent clout. However the stars of this instalment have to be Luke Evans and Michelle Rodriguez. Unfortunately Evans’ Shaw is slightly underdeveloped, meaning we don’t get to learn about a baddie who could potentially threaten more than he actually did. Rodriguez gives her best performance as Letty, with Furious 6 giving her the opportunity to show emotion and depth rather than being there to dangle off Diesel’s arm.

Some of the actors suffer from their characters being side-lined – Jordana Brewster in particular is unfortunate enough to be completely left aside. As the rest of the crew trash cars across the globe, her character Mia is left to hold a newborn baby and barely participate in events. In the first ten minutes these side characters spout off dialogue that even children would refuse to speak. The constant uttering of the word ‘family’ is seriously cringe worthy stuff, but as soon as cars get involved the issue with dialogue becomes unnoticeable. Let’s be honest, the Fast franchise was never known for its dialogue sequences so perhaps we should let it off.

The action in this instalment is on a much higher scale. Fast 5 raised the bar but in terms of smashing stuff up, this one exceeds it. Lin provides excellent direction, with the editing adding to his frantic style. All things considered, Furious 6 delivers everything it promised it would. Watch it to have fun and you’ll take a lot from this movie; it’s not trying to deceive you – it’s pure mindless entertainment. Lin proves that at movie number 6 you can still wow an audience.

★★★

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