‘Pilot’

With a relatively strong opening, The 100 could promise to be an engaging addition to the futuristic genre of TV. However, it could also prove to be yet another lightweight destined for failure.

At the risk of becoming too critical, I first must admit that I enjoyed the pilot episode of The 100. As we know too well, an interesting premise is extremely rare to come by these days but this series seems to have stumbled upon an exciting concept. So what is The 100, I hear you ask? The 100 delves into a dystopian adventure of 100 prisoners sent from a now space-inhabited human population, to explore the dangers of the radiated world they left behind: Earth.
the-100-episode-1The main protagonist, Clarke (Eliza Taylor), is a natural-born leader, and a character I can easily see myself rooting for in the long haul. The snarky, intelligent daughter of an engineer and a scientist, I’m expecting a lot from this character, who already proves herself to be efficient and highly prioritised the moment the 100 land on Earth. As well as Clarke, a main cast is quickly assumed with brother-sister duo Bellamy and Octavia, and the two likable science geeks, Jasper and Monty. Perhaps not the most original of characters, yet there’s instantly something natural about each actor individually, and as a group. They’re believable and whilst at times eye-roll worthy, still create a dynamic worth investing in.

The dual narrative between the group on Earth and those struggling in the space station is quick to create tension and interest. Without giving away any major spoilers, let me just say that there’s more than one shocking moment both at the beginning and towards the end. If it’s any praise, The 100 certainly doesn’t allow you time to recuperate. It begins with a strong opening, and ends with a cliff-hanger just as strong.

Although I’m not entirely convinced it has the staying power needed for such a series, I’ll continue to watch The 100 until it proves unworthy. Given its promising pilot, I sincerely hope that it remains as engaging as its premiere.